3 comments

  1. I think this original version is even better than Snap Judgment’s because it tells more of the whole story… thank you for this inspiring piece!

  2. dear jonathan:
    I was so pleased to hear you on snap judgment, another of my favorite radio shows! I also heard you on our local npr station, kalw, in san francisco, but it wasn’t this show. are you going to appear on other shows on npr? in any case, it’s such a fabulous gift to have you on podcasts and hear tswi once again.

    I have never been so moved at the tenacity and dedication stuart had to have to see this piece completed. not to mention the belief he needed to have in himself–making a million pounds, and then having to make some more, yet again, because it had to be played by the london philharmonic orchestra. most of us have those kind of dreams “beaten” out of us, either literally or just by life its own self, quite early. it took well over 20 years of his life and he never wavered. I’m just gobsmacked, truly.

    thank you for letting us hear this man’s amazing story (I too enjoyed the original version, as much as I love snap judgment). at nearly 60 years old, I’m within 6 weeks of receiving my doctorate in clinical psychology, only a 10 year journey, but nonetheless it has been one of equal agony and ecstasy. I, as well as my husband, friends, and family, have many times thought I must have been temporarily insane, or soon would be, to ever have thought I had the wherewithal, the sheer single-mindedness to realize his dream.

    my personal everest has been in service of the dream to work with others like me, those who are disabled with chronic pain, an underserved, misdiagnosed, and misunderstood population. I want to be the kind of mental healthcare worker I wish I’d had when I was first hurt, feeling helpless and utterly hopeless, my life as I knew it over.

    it’s critical to find others who have followed their dream, regardless of the adversity. it really does take a village, even if it’s one out in the ethernet. being a witness to this man’s odyssey was a rare privilege. thank you.

    I apologize for the length of this letter, but I don’t have enough time to make it shorter.

    yours,
    lynn befera

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